120 Gallon Aquarium On Second Floor

Fishlover832

I don't know if this is the right place to put this but I need some help. I bought a 120 gallon (48"L, 24"W, 24"H) aquarium and I would like to put it in my room on the second floor. Before I pay for an engineer to come over and look at it, I want to know what you guys think. My room is the smallest (probably 12'x12') and sits against the outside and then against a bathroom on the opposite side. I would like to put the tank next to the side where the bathroom is. The joists run adjacent to where I wold like to put the aquarium. I believe the joists are 16" apart and are 2x8 or 2x10. There is also a beam that connects the joists (meaning it goes parallel to the tank) and it looks like it's within a foot of where the tank would go. The stand is not just four legs, it's the full length. All of this being said, the floor is the ceiling to my family room below, but there are walls I would say 4 feet left and right of where the tank would be above. Would you say it's possible that this could work or do you think it's totally out of the question?
 

James17

If it is sitting across several floor joists I think it would be fine.
 

Rythmyc

The only worry I would have is any spills from maintenance. Over time it will pay its toll
 

Fishlover832

It's most likely that it spans only 2 joists. But it might span 3 if the tank is centered on a joist.

I'm not worried about spills as I have a rubber carpet around it.

I don't think 2 joists is enough for this 1500 lb. aquarium but maybe I'm wrong.

I feel pretty ashamed of myself as I said adjacent instead of perpendicular lol. Anyway, if I got the tank centered so that it would be supported by 3 joists, do you think that would be enough?
 

vikingkirken

I think you should get a structural engineer in there to look at it!! There's an enormous difference between "2x8's or 2x10's", and it's hard to look at the full picture of joist spans, supporting walls, etc without a detailed diagram or look at the house. It's worth every penny for peace of mind!
 

Fishlover832

I took pictures of the joists in my home and my basement is unfinished so if it's the same I can check there. I also might be able to find some things with the building "blueprints". My friend, who's an architect, is coming over this week to help determine if this will work. Since I'm here right now, I also wanted to ask one more question. Since my basement is unfinished, will adding support to my basement help the second floor considerably or should I be worried about the floor in between and supporting that one? The reason I ask is because I can't directly support my second floor but I can support the first floor from the basement without much trouble.
 

California L33

Only one way to find out . Make sure the camera's running for You Tube and don't forget to yell, "There she goes!" as it plummets. If it lands on your dog or pickup truck you can write a chart topping country song about it.
 

Fishlover832

Lol. Problem is I'll be moving in a few years so I don't want to have to fix broken joists or a hole in the floor/ceiling.

Plus I don't think my cat would appreciate a 120 gallon aquarium falling on her
 

vikingkirken

An architect should be able to give you a good idea of whether it'll work!

Keep in mind that there is "falling through the floor", and there is also much-less-dramatic floor weakening and sagging over time to consider. An architect or engineer can help you avoid either.

Only one way to find out . Make sure the camera's running for You Tube and don't forget to yell, "There she goes!" as it plummets. If it lands on your dog or pickup truck you can write a chart topping country song about it.
I don't know whether to laugh or cry at this!
 

Fishlover832

Cool, then I'll just wait until Wednesday. Hopefully it will work out.
 

NightShade

Yea, I'd wait to get the architect friends advice. An engineer (no offense to architects! I would've loved to do that as a job! ) will be more definitive. But, if you have the blueprints and all... I truly think an architect will be informative enough. Just be sure to calculate the weight of the aquarium, stand, water, substrate, and hardscape etc ~ **and then some!! LOL! So you have a sound mind! (Grandfather was an engineer, future father in law, & brother in laws are too.... I was always taught that you can't be too safe!! Lol, and still am )

Only one way to find out . Make sure the camera's running for You Tube and don't forget to yell, "There she goes!" as it plummets. If it lands on your dog or pickup truck you can write a chart topping country song about it.

I don't know whether to laugh or cry at this!

I know right!?!?


Lol... ok... laughing at it!
 

ramsbee

I just went through this exact same thing. I luckily work for a construction company so I was able to get a structural engineer over. And there is A LOT that goes into this. Including what the flooring is and the direction it runs. Luckily I had a closet so no carpet had to be ripped up. I got the ok for it. But spans and where load bearing walls, floor joists size plus how the joists are hung. It's better to be safe than sorry.
 

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