10g extremely cloudy after water/filter change

xr4ticrew

Hi - I did a 30% water change/cleaning on the 14th and the water has be really cloudy ever since. I tested everything yesterday and it all looks good with the exception of ammonia, it's between .5 and 1. Is this normal and will it clear up by itself in a week? The tank has been setup since December 25th.
 

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Dunk2

Hi - I did a 30% water change/cleaning on the 14th and the water has be really cloudy ever since. I tested everything yesterday and it all looks good with the exception of ammonia, it's between .5 and 1. Is this normal and will it clear up by itself in a week? The tank has been setup since December 25th.
Welcome to Fishlore. I’d suggest you read this. . .
Aquarium Nitrogen Cycle

Your tank isn’t fully cycled and the cloudiness is likely a bacteria bloom. Are you also testing for nitrites and nitrates?

For tanks that aren’t fully cycled with fish in them, I suggest daily testing and changing enough water to keep the combined level of ammonia and nitrites at or below 0.50 ppm.

What exactly are you doing when you clean the tank? And what are you using to test?

If you’re not already using it, I’d suggest Seachem Prime as your water conditioner.
 

xr4ticrew

Welcome to Fishlore. I’d suggest you read this. . .
Aquarium Nitrogen Cycle

Your tank isn’t fully cycled and the cloudiness is likely a bacteria bloom. Are you also testing for nitrites and nitrates?

For tanks that aren’t fully cycled with fish in them, I suggest daily testing and changing enough water to keep the combined level of ammonia and nitrites at or below 0.50 ppm.

What exactly are you doing when you clean the tank? And what are you using to test?

If you’re not already using it, I’d suggest Seachem Prime as your water conditioner.

This last cleaning I replaced the filter media and cleaned the tank/vacuumed the rocks and cleaned 3 of the 4 glass sides. I currently use this when doing a water change API Quick Start or when adding fish. I also use this API Test Kit . I replaced my filter media due to it's color (brown) and reduction in flow. My PH was 7.4ish Nitrite was 0ppm and Nitrate was also 0ppm.
 

carsonsgjs

This last cleaning I replaced the filter media and cleaned the tank/vacuumed the rocks and cleaned 3 of the 4 glass sides. I currently use this when doing a water change API Quick Start or when adding fish. I also use this API Test Kit . I replaced my filter media due to it's color (brown) and reduction in flow. My PH was 7.4ish Nitrite was 0ppm and Nitrate was also 0ppm.
You just need to give your media a rinse in old tank water then put it back. By removing it and replacing it with new, you are removing a large portion of your nitrifying bacteria, which will cause issues with your cycle. May also explain the cloudy water.

Edit - just seen Dunks post, ignore me!
 

Dunk2

This last cleaning I replaced the filter media and cleaned the tank/vacuumed the rocks and cleaned 3 of the 4 glass sides. I currently use this when doing a water change API Quick Start or when adding fish. I also use this API Test Kit . I replaced my filter media due to it's color (brown) and reduction in flow. My PH was 7.4ish Nitrite was 0ppm and Nitrate was also 0ppm.
Despite what some filter media manufacturers suggest, brown filter media is a good thing and shouldn’t be thrown out unless it’s literally falling apart.

The media is where the vast majority of ammonia and nitrite eating bacteria live. . . By throwing it out, you’ve basically started the cycling process all over again.

When media needs cleaned because flow is being restricted, swish it around in water removed from your tank during a water change.

About cleaning your tank, I like the advice from mattgirl. . . Our tanks should NOT be the cleanest things in our homes.
 

xr4ticrew

Despite what some filter media manufacturers suggest, brown filter media is a good thing and shouldn’t be thrown out unless it’s literally falling apart.

The media is where the vast majority of ammonia and nitrite eating bacteria live. . . By throwing it out, you’ve basically started the cycling process all over again.

When media needs cleaned because flow is being restricted, swish it around in water removed from your tank during a water change.

About cleaning your tank, I like the advice from mattgirl. . . Our tanks should NOT be the cleanest things in our homes.
Great, I appreciate all of the advice. How often should I be doing a water change and what percentage? Since I have had the aquarium up I have never had a 0ppm for ammonia.
 

Dunk2

Great, I appreciate all of the advice. How often should I be doing a water change and what percentage? Since I have had the aquarium up I have never had a 0ppm for ammonia.
See my post #2 above. . . For tanks that aren’t fully cycled with fish in them, I suggest daily testing and changing enough water to keep the combined level of ammonia and nitrites at or below 0.50 ppm.

A simple example. . . If your daily testing shows a combined level of ammonia and nitrites of 1.0 ppm, a 50% water change will bring the combined level down to 0.50 ppm.

As a warning :), that could mean daily water changes.
 

xr4ticrew

I'll start today and see how it goes, thanks again for the advice. One last question, I am wondering if the filter that came with my tank is really sufficient or if I will need to purchase a higher quality one. Top Fin Internal Filter is what I have.
 

Dunk2

The filters that come with tanks as sort of a starter kit often aren’t great, but in fairness I’m not familiar with that specific filter.

If it was my tank, I’d likely get a better filter.
 

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