10 Gallon Shrimp Tank

jreinhart

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My wife and I have been watching a bunch of shrimp videos on Youtube. We really enjoy the ones posted by Brian of Aquatic Support Systems. You can find his entire playlist at Shrimp - YouTube

He posts monthly update videos along with some time-lapse and one or more how to sort of things.

Anyway, my wife got really excited and wants to use her Aqueon 5 gallon MiniBow to do shrimp. Her excitement was contagious and I used Black Friday sales as a spur of the moment reason to do my own shrimp tank.

There's nothing fun to show at this point but I'll cover what I've done so far. Additionally I plan to set up a proper blog in the new member blog section.

For Black Friday (and the weekend) Petco had a special for Aqueon LED 10 gallon aquarium kits. I went into Petco hoping to get a plain 10 gallon to use as a hospital/quarantine tank. Didn't do that but the kit caught my eye. The kit was on sale for $39.99, which is 50% off.

Before I go further I should add that I have a 25 gallon dirted planted tank in the basement. Recently I've regretted putting that tank in the basement because we're never down there except for laundry or when the tank needs stuff done. The shrimp tank will be in our living room.

Anyway, I've been reading up on freshwater shrimp for a while and watched numerous Youtube videos that were informative. Between those, some postings here, and the help of Msjinkzd () I felt ready to create a shopping list for gear.

The Aqueon LED 10 gallon kit comes with a 10 gallon glass aquarium, LED light, Aqueon heater, some fish food, water conditioner, Aqueon QuietFlow 10 HOB filter, and a couple things I can't think of. For shrimp keeping I need to replace a few of the items from the kit.

In fact the only things I'm keeping are:

  • 10 gallon aquarium
  • Heater (think it is a 50 watt)
  • LED light hood

This tank will house Neocaridina davidi (formerly heteropoda) var. red "Cherry" aka Red Cherry Shrimp (perhaps a higher grade like Sakura etc). Am hoping they will breed and make shrimplets. This requires some other gear.

Using Amazon I bought:


All of that cost me $33.24. I bought two of the sponge filters and two check valves. One sponge filter will go in my wife's shrimp tank. The air pump will power both tanks, which will be physically adjacent.

For substrate I read that Red Cherry shrimp really show their colors on a dark substrate. I have some leftover Flourite Dark from my 25 gallon planted tank. That will go in my shrimp tank. At Petco I picked up some TSS to help cycle the tank. I will also seed it with some filter media from my existing 25 gallon to help speed up the cycle.

The Brian who I mentioned near the beginning of this post was nice enough to respond to some questions I left on one of his shrimp Youtube videos. He suggested that I purchase a TDS meter because Red Cherry shrimp do best with a TDS of below 200. He also gave gH and kH levels I could test for if I pick up a test kit for those (the API Freshwater master kit I have doesn't have those tests).

Again using Amazon I picked up:
  • HM TDS-EZ -

That cost $15.39 and is the model Brian uses on all of his shrimp tanks. He has 10+ tanks devoted to a variety of shrimp including harder to keep species.

The next items I need to consider purchasing are alder cones and indian almond leaves. I've read that red cherry shrimp do well with both. My water tends to be 6.8-7 pH but those will help to keep it lower.

After Christmas I will set up the Petco Newport 20 gallon stand along with the aquarium and components. Then I'll begin the cycle.

When I'm ready to order shrimp I am mail ordering them from Msjinkzd. She has been incredibly helpful by answering questions e-mailed to her. She currently charges $2 per Red Cherry Shrimp. It was recommended to start with 10 shrimp as the suggested ratio is 10 adult shrimp per gallon. It is also important to leave plenty of room for the population to expand because these shrimp breed readily.

As I do more I'll let everyone know. Hopefully I'll soon have photos of the gear.
 

Plecomaker

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Im impressed, thats some excellent research and preplanning
i might also be taking notes
 
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jreinhart

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Plecomaker said:
Im impressed, thats some excellent research and preplanning
i might also be taking notes
Thanks! At last I have some photos to share.

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bigdreams

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Nice, I just ordered a TDS meter myself. The one you got isn't autocalibrating for temperature though. I think the water temp needs to be 77 degrees for it to be accurate. Worth double checking once you get it. Just a heads up.
 
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jreinhart

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bigdreams said:
Nice, I just ordered a TDS meter myself. The one you got isn't autocalibrating for temperature though. I think the water temp needs to be 77 degrees for it to be accurate. Worth double checking once you get it. Just a heads up.
That last post I did has a photo near the bottom, which shows the back of the HM Digital TDS-EZ TDS meter packaging. There is a section covering calibration. That section also contains a link to more detailed calibration information from the manufacturer.

There is no mention of needing to calibrate the meter for a specific temperature. It is calibrated to NaCL 342 pm and the instructions say the TDS meter can be calibrated by the user as well as needed.

Take a peek at: http://www.tdsmeter.com/calibration_maintenance.html

I don't think I'll have any need to calibrate this for certain water temperatures but you are correct that the ideal water temperature for a reading is 25 degrees celsius according to the manufacturer. Although the manufacturer doesn't state that that temperature is mandatory for a reliable reading. It should be suitable for my needs as I'm not using it in a scientific laboratory setting....I think.
 

bigdreams

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I meant temperature compensation, not calibration, my mistake. Here is some info: http://reefkeeping.com/issues/2004-04/rhf/feature/index.php

If you are measuring at same temperature as reference temperature it should be ok. I was going to measure at 72, 80, etc, and tap water ( below 60 degrees), so wanted a device that could handle that.

Apparently conductivity changes as a (complicated) function of temperature.
 
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