10 gallon filter in 36 gallon tank with air pump?

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SomyaValecha

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I'm trying to start a new tank and I had a filter from before that was a 10 gallon filter. My understanding is that filters are just a box that agitates water to create flow and holds the beneficial bacteria. So my question is, if there's sufficient bacteria in the filter, and if I get an air pump to put oxygen in the tank and create the agitation, can I just use this filter? I don't see why it wouldn't work so if there is any problem in doing so please tell me! I'm planning on using some media from my other tank to instantly cycle this one.
 
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kallililly1973

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It should get your new tank cycled with established media in it but u will need to upgrade the filter to accomodate the bigger tank once you have it stocked
 
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SomyaValecha

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kallililly1973 said:
It should get your new tank cycled with established media in it but u will need to upgrade the filter to accomodate the bigger tank once you have it stocked
Is there any reason why it wouldn't work long-term?
 
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Skrabbitskrabbit

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My guess is that it depends on how many gallons per hour your filter can handle turning over, I think there’s a sticky thread on the topic in filtration forum that explains better than I can.
 
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Pfrozen

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SomyaValecha said:
Is there any reason why it wouldn't work long-term?
It doesnt just create a spot for water to flow through a colony of good bacteria.. there are many things in your water that need to be mechanically filtered out, otherwise you'll end up with water that looks filthy. It's also likely that a 10g filter wouldn't process your water fast enough anyways.. that's only 50 gallons per hour when then recommended filtration is 300-360 gallons per hour for your tank. You would probably see ammonia spikes constantly along with the water being dirty :(
 
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Fisch

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How do you plan to stock it? How many plants are/will be in the tank. A 10gl filter should be okay if you are understocked and provide enough oxygenation and turnover of the water (ma be with a power head).
 
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Islandvic

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How was the previous 10g tank stocked and how will the new 36g be stocked?

A single 10g cartridge based filter will not be enough for a 36g tank in my opinion.

I wouldn't get to caught up with GPH and turnover, but look at the filter reservoir size.

Also, you mention that a filter is mainly a box to "agitate water to create flow and hold beneficial bacteria".

That is sort of correct. A filter's main job is to not agitate water. I think you are confusing surface agitation from air stones with what the filter does. Filters circulate tank water through media for mechanical and biological filtration.

Depending on the media, it will catch large and medium sized muck in the water and sometimes very fine muck.

Additionally, it provides a space for media with large surface area (i.e. layers of foam sponge, sintered glass or ceramic media, pumice, etc) to colonize beneficial bacteria as water flows through it.

Surface agitation is a secondary byproduct of the filter's main function.

If you already have an airpump and airstone, then buy a sponge filter and drop it in the corner of the tank. Place your 10g HOB style filter on tbe other side.

A large sponge filter driven off the air pump will easily supplement the smaller HOB filter.

Aquarium Co-Op, ATI, Aquatop and Hikari make good sponge filters.
 
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Pfrozen

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I've had success with the supplemental sponge filter method mentioned above
 
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Rockymountainstream

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So have I.
 
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