10 gallon cleanup

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fengshui

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I have neglected a 10 gallon planted tank with cherry and amano shrimp all of which are alive! Now that it is summer, I have the time to actually care for the tank. There seems to be a lot of debris and dead plants mixed into the substrate. What would be the best and fastest way to clean the tank without killing the shrimps? Thanks.
 
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TSzabo

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With that much in there itd be wise to do a series of small cleanings and water changes over a week or even a bit longer. If you do too much at one time you risk sending the system into shock and it wont have time to recover.

Just keep it simple. Its going to take a bit of time to bring that tank back around so be patient with it.
 
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fengshui

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Would it be wise to just take out the remaining drift wood, heater, sponge filter, large pieces of plants and shrimp and place them into a bucket. Then clean the substrate and gravel vac all debris. There are thousands of snails in there, how could I remove them most quickly?! Also, there is currently no HOB filter since a sponge filter was for shrimps only. However, I may use my spare Marineland 350 or Aquaclear 20, which should I use; both? I plan on getting one centerpiece fish or a small shoal that can live with amano and cherry shrimp. The shrimp will be provided a lot of cover so a few snacking on a couple of shrimps does not bother me as long as the population increases.
 

Bluestreakfl

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If you do any smaller fish in that size tank, id recommend Celestial Pearl Danios, or some species of dwarf/micro rasbora. Anything else is really to big, or needs more swim room than a 10g can provide. You could probably get away with 10 celestial pearls in that tank given it has enough plants and cover.
 
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Which of these fish would be most common, hardy and easy to care for.

Are there fish that breed easily, eat algae and snails? Thanks.
 
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Bluestreakfl

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Not that would fit in a 10g unfortunately. You could however add 1-2 nerite snails and they would get the algae to a healthy minimum over the course of about 1-2 weeks. Celestial Pearl Danio are fairly easy to breed, just make sure you have dense plant cover for fry if you dont plan on having a 2nd tank for fry and or breeding, the adults will eat their offspring.
 
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fengshui

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Not much for a 10 gallon...
I wouldn't get any fish that breeds easily, as they can take over your tank
For common fish, how about endler guppies? Get only males tho




I plan on breeding them and feeding the fry to my main tank. Could I also use this tank as a brine shrimp hatchery? How exactly do I hatch the brine shrimp eggs? Are danios egg layers?
 
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Bluestreakfl

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I usually consider 1 platy = to 2 guppy as far as how much waste theyll produce. Also with livebearers if you plan to breed, you want 1 male to 3 females generally as theyll constantly breed and with not enough females to males, the males will stress the females to death with the constant breeding attempts. If you plan on breeding them, id stick to one or the other for the livebearers, guppies or platies but not both. Id go with 4 total, as the fry will be produced quickly, any more adults than that and you may have problems. Also guppy fry are notorious for surviving, and unless you have much larger aggressive fish to eat them, you may find that some fry will survive even in the bigger tank.
 
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fengshui

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Ok thank you. Should I cycle the tank since the tank has only held shrimps and plants with nothing more added to it not even food.
 

Bluestreakfl

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You shouldn't need to, as long as you add maybe 2 guppies first, wait a week or so, then add the other 2, feeding very lightly over the course of adding them. I'd add 2 females first, then a male and a female last. Some of your females may already come pregnant, as most livebearers can hold sperm and continually use it for several months.


 

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If you add a HOB filter, make sure you get a pre-filter sponge for the intake so baby shrimp and guppy fry dont get sucked into your filter. It couldnt hurt to add more filtration. It may not be necessary, but it will help keep your water clean for longer by removing more solid waste.
 

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Just wanted to chime in and say since you already have spare filtration, a 20 gallon tank is only $20 at Petco right now
It'd give you a lot more options.
 
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