Aquarium Fish

Black Neon Tetra

The Black Neon Tetra is another great fish for planted aquariums where slightly acidic water conditions are present. The Black Neon Tetra has a yellow-green stripe that runs the length of the body with a black region under the yellow-green stripe. It looks really neat when you see a school of this fish darting about. The Black Neon Tetra is even smaller than the Cardinal Tetra and Neon Tetra and will display the same schooling behavior when kept in small groups of 6 or more. They are very peaceful and should not be kept with larger fish capable of eating them.

Most Black Neon Tetras available in your local pet shops have been farm raised and should be relatively disease free, but you never know. It's always a good idea to keep any new fish in a Quarantine Tank for a few weeks for monitoring before introducing them into your main tank. The Black Neon Tetra can be sensitive to fluctuations in pH and temperature. You may also want to take a little longer when acclimating this fish to your tank water. Take an hour (instead of 15 minutes) and slowly add small amounts of tank water to the bag every 10 minutes or so.

They will accept smaller fish food including flakes, frozen, freeze dried and live foods.

Black Neon Tetra Picture

Black Neon Tetra
Hyphessobrycon herbertaxelrodi

Black Neon Tetra Video

Black Neon Tetra Care Facts

Scientific Name : Hyphessobrycon herbertaxelrodi

Common Names : Black Neon Tetra, Black Neons

Care Level : Easy to Moderate

Size : 1.5 inches (3-4 cm)

pH : 5.5 - 7.0

Temperature : 72°F - 80°F (22°C - 27°C)

Black Neon Tetra Lifespan : 3 - 5 years

Origin / Habitat : South America, Brazil

Temperament / Behavior : Very peaceful and best kept in a small school (shoal) of 6 or more.

Black Neon Tetra Breeding : They have been bred in captivity and are egg layers.

Aquarium Size : 20 gallon minimum (schooling fish)

Black Neon Tetra Tank Mates : They are a very peaceful little fish. Keep them in a small school and try not to keep them with larger fish that may be tempted to eat them, such as Angelfish

Fish Disease : Freshwater Fish Disease

Diet / Foods : An omnivore - provide a varied diet with live food, frozen food and they should accept flake food.

Tank Region : Middle to bottom

Gender : Can be difficult to determine, female may be more full bodied

Fish Lore Forum : Black Tetra Forum

Author : Mike FishLore

Forum Avatar :
Black Neon Tetra

Black Neon Tetra Tips

From: Caitlin
I have 5 "Black Neon Tetras" in a tank with a few regular Neon Tetras and some Blue Tetras. They are so peaceful and pretty. They all stay in their own groups, so it might be better to choose one type of tetra per tank so you can have a large school. They get on fine with the Neons, but the Blue Tetras (a silvery opaline color with a hint of blue) chase them sometimes- even though they aren't much bigger. Right now if I had to choose what my absolute favorite tetra is it would definitely be these pretty black neons. They look great in a well planted aquarium.

From: James
I'm still trying to figure out how the common name was decided on. They could have just as easily called it the yellow neon tetra instead of the Black Neon Tetra. Seriously though, this is a great little fish that does well with others of its own kind in a heavily planted tank.

From: Kathy
I just got 4 Black Tetras for my tank. They swim around with my Zebra Danios and seem to be playing around with each other and enjoying themselves. It looks so fantastic when they're darting around the tank and past the bigger fish.

From: Allan - Dead Neon Tetra
This morning I had a dead Black Neon Tetra on the bottom of my tank (strangely, it was actually upside down). I tested my water and it was at 20 for nitrates, 0 for nitrites and .25 for ammonia. I do not think any of these were the cause. She was definitely a female and had a reddish spot near her anal areas. What caused her to die?
We need more information to hazard a guess as to what exactly happened. What is the tank temperature, pH, is this a new tank setup, water change regimen, tank mates, etc. Your test kits could be off a bit and you could have more ammonia than you think.

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